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How to Design a Kitchen Lighting for Eye Health and Better Beauty | Home Interior Designs

How to Design a Kitchen Lighting for Eye Health and Better Beauty

How to Design a Kitchen Lighting for Eye Health and Better Beauty - As we age, the lens of the eye becomes less flexible, and our lighting requirements change. The ability to focus on near objects decreases, which explains why many people need reading glasses as they get older. The lens of the eye also becomes denser and yellower, decreasing the transmission of light, so that more light is often needed to see. This changes how we perceive colors; they become more muted and muddy. Just try looking through a yellow filter to see what I mean you'll benefit from lighter colors surrounding you. The eyes become more susceptible to glare as well, making the need for contrast greater.

There are many other issues that affect aging eye lenses too, so older eyes require different lighting solutions. These solutions won't benefit just them; they will also help create more beautiful household surroundings. Considering the right amount of light, location of the light source and color temperature will improve your and your family's sense of well-being.

Let’s look at a few lighting solutions, starting with the kitchen.

Up Lighting for Kitchen

The most common use of up lighting is in a recessed cove around the top perimeter of a room. To maximize light output, use a T5 fluorescent or LED light source that will wash the ceiling with light. This helps to create a brighter ceiling that bounces and reflects light throughout the space without glare. Combine this with lots of natural daylight to increase the overall light levels in a room.

If your cabinets don't go to the ceiling, consider adding lights above the cabinets. Using a more powerful light source, such as a T5 fluorescent, increases the reflectivity of the ceiling, thereby increasing the light in the room.

While increasing light levels is important, it is equally important to minimize glare. Use matte finishes to reduce light flares and glare.

Downlighting

Downlighting is just that: lighting that shines down to illuminate a space. Down lighting can sometimes be referred to as general lighting. Once it was simply the only light source in a room — that single fixture in the middle of the ceiling. If this is your only option, placement and quantity of fixtures are the keys to attaining a balanced lighting level while reducing dark corners. Pot lights are also considered downlighting.

Task lighting, including undercabinet lghting, is one of the single most important lighting specifications for any project, in my opinion. It puts the light where you need it most. In a kitchen it would be under the cabinet, where the light is in front of you, illuminating the surface and its objects, and not behind you, creating shadows. Pendants can also be considered task lighting.

Source : houzz.com


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